Henry 8

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Henry 8

Henry VIII. König Heinrich VIII. und seine 6 Ehefrauen .und die Moral von der Geschicht': Heirat' keinen Henry nicht! Herrscher aus dem Hause Tudor. Heinrich VIII. Tudor war von 15König von England, seit Herr und ab König von Irland. Heinrich VIII. Tudor (englisch Henry Tudor; * Juni in Greenwich; † Januar im Whitehall-Palast, London) war von 15König von.

Henry 8 Schlagwörter in Deutsch

Heinrich VIII. Tudor war von 15König von England, seit Herr und ab König von Irland. Heinrich VIII. Tudor (englisch Henry Tudor; * Juni in Greenwich; † Januar im Whitehall-Palast, London) war von 15König von. Heinrich VIII (englisch The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eighth oder einfach Henry VIII, Alternativtitel war bis zur Veröffentlichung im First Folio. Henry war 17 Jahre alt, als sein Vater starb und er die Herrschaft als Heinrich VIII. von England übernahm. Die Bevölkerung feierte ihn euphorisch und. Januar wurde Henry VIII. in voller Rüstung vom Pferd geworfen, das Reittier rollte überdies über den Monarchen hinweg. Zwei Stunden lang war er. Sohn Henry starb nach 52 Tagen. Aber die Thronfolge. Schon 18 Monate nach der Heirat mit Katarina durchlitt der kaum Zwanzigjährige Glück. Henry VIII. König Heinrich VIII. und seine 6 Ehefrauen .und die Moral von der Geschicht': Heirat' keinen Henry nicht! Herrscher aus dem Hause Tudor.

Henry 8

Heinrich VIII. Tudor (englisch Henry Tudor; * Juni in Greenwich; † Januar im Whitehall-Palast, London) war von 15König von. Henry war 17 Jahre alt, als sein Vater starb und er die Herrschaft als Heinrich VIII. von England übernahm. Die Bevölkerung feierte ihn euphorisch und. Sohn Henry starb nach 52 Tagen. Aber die Thronfolge. Schon 18 Monate nach der Heirat mit Katarina durchlitt der kaum Zwanzigjährige Glück.

Henry 8 Who Was King Henry VIII? Video

The Six Queens of Henry VIII Episode 1

Despite the early success with Scotland, Henry hesitated to invade France, annoying Charles. Henry finally went to France in June with a two-pronged attack.

One force under Norfolk ineffectively besieged Montreuil. The other, under Suffolk, laid siege to Boulogne. Henry later took personal command, and Boulogne fell on 18 September Charles' own campaign fizzled, and he made peace with France that same day.

Francis attempted to invade England in the summer of , but reached only the Isle of Wight before being repulsed in the Battle of the Solent.

Henry secured Boulogne for eight years. Henry married his last wife, the wealthy widow Catherine Parr , in July Henry remained committed to an idiosyncratic mixture of Catholicism and Protestantism; the reactionary mood that had gained ground after Cromwell's fall had neither eliminated his Protestant streak nor been overcome by it.

The same act allowed Henry to determine further succession to the throne in his will. He was covered with painful, pus -filled boils and possibly suffered from gout.

His obesity and other medical problems can be traced to the jousting accident in in which he suffered a leg wound.

The accident reopened and aggravated an injury he had sustained years earlier, to the extent that his doctors found it difficult to treat.

The chronic wound festered for the remainder of his life and became ulcerated , preventing him from maintaining the level of physical activity he had previously enjoyed.

The jousting accident is also believed to have caused Henry's mood swings , which may have had a dramatic effect on his personality and temperament.

The theory that Henry suffered from syphilis has been dismissed by most historians. This analysis identifies growth hormone deficiency GHD as the reason for his increased adiposity but also significant behavioural changes noted in his later years, including his multiple marriages.

Henry's obesity hastened his death at the age of 55, on 28 January in the Palace of Whitehall , on what would have been his father's 90th birthday.

The tomb he had planned with components taken from the tomb intended for Cardinal Wolsey was only partly constructed and was never completed. The sarcophagus and its base were later removed and used for Lord Nelson 's tomb in the crypt of St.

Paul's Cathedral. What is extraordinary is that Henry was usually a very good husband. And he liked women—that's why he married so many of them! He was very tender to them, we know that he addressed them as "sweetheart.

He was immensely considerate when they were pregnant. But, once he had fallen out of love He just withdrew.

He abandoned them. They didn't even know he'd left them. Upon Henry's death, he was succeeded by his son Edward VI. Since Edward was then only nine years old, he could not rule directly.

Instead, Henry's will designated 16 executors to serve on a council of regency until Edward reached If Mary's issue failed, the crown was to go to Elizabeth, Henry's daughter by Anne Boleyn, and her heirs.

Finally, if Elizabeth's line became extinct, the crown was to be inherited by the descendants of Henry VIII's deceased younger sister, Mary, the Greys.

The descendants of Henry's sister Margaret—the Stuarts, rulers of Scotland—were thereby excluded from the succession. Henry cultivated the image of a Renaissance man , and his court was a centre of scholarly and artistic innovation and glamorous excess, epitomised by the Field of the Cloth of Gold.

He scouted the country for choirboys, taking some directly from Wolsey's choir, and introduced Renaissance music into court. He was skilled on the lute and played the organ, and was a talented player of the virginals.

Henry was an avid gambler and dice player, and excelled at sports, especially jousting, hunting, and real tennis. He was also known for his strong defence of conventional Christian piety.

Henry was an intellectual, the first English king with a modern humanist education. He read and wrote English, French, and Latin, and owned a large library.

He annotated many books and published one of his own, and he had numerous pamphlets and lectures prepared to support the reformation of the church.

Richard Sampson's Oratio , for example, was an argument for absolute obedience to the monarchy and claimed that the English church had always been independent from Rome.

Henry was a large, well-built athlete, over 6 feet [1. His athletic activities were more than pastimes; they were political devices that served multiple goals, enhancing his image, impressing foreign emissaries and rulers, and conveying his ability to suppress any rebellion.

He arranged a jousting tournament at Greenwich in where he wore gilded armour and gilded horse trappings, and outfits of velvet, satin, and cloth of gold with pearls and jewels.

It suitably impressed foreign ambassadors, one of whom wrote home that "the wealth and civilisation of the world are here, and those who call the English barbarians appear to me to render themselves such".

He then started adding weight and lost the trim, athletic figure that had made him so handsome, and his courtiers began dressing in heavily padded clothes to emulate and flatter him.

His health rapidly declined near the end of his reign. The power of Tudor monarchs, including Henry, was 'whole' and 'entire', ruling, as they claimed, by the grace of God alone.

These included acts of diplomacy including royal marriages , declarations of war, management of the coinage, the issue of royal pardons and the power to summon and dissolve parliament as and when required.

In practice, Tudor monarchs used patronage to maintain a royal court that included formal institutions such as the Privy Council as well as more informal advisers and confidants.

Elton has argued that one such minister, Thomas Cromwell, led a "Tudor revolution in government" independently of the king, whom Elton presented as an opportunistic, essentially lazy participant in the nitty-gritty of politics.

Where Henry did intervene personally in the running of the country, Elton argued, he mostly did so to its detriment. From to , Thomas Wolsey — , a cardinal of the established Church, oversaw domestic and foreign policy for the king from his position as Lord Chancellor.

The Star Chamber's overall structure remained unchanged, but Wolsey used it to provide much-needed reform of the criminal law.

The power of the court itself did not outlive Wolsey, however, since no serious administrative reform was undertaken and its role eventually devolved to the localities.

Thomas Cromwell c. Returning to England from the continent in or , Cromwell soon entered Wolsey's service. He turned to law, also picking up a good knowledge of the Bible, and was admitted to Gray's Inn in He became Wolsey's "man of all work".

By , Cromwell and his associates were already responsible for the drafting of much legislation.

Cromwell did much work through his many offices to remove the tasks of government from the Royal Household and ideologically from the personal body of the King and into a public state.

Henry inherited a vast fortune and a prosperous economy from his father, who had been frugal. He augmented the royal treasury by seizing church lands, but his heavy spending and long periods of mismanagement damaged the economy.

Henry spent much of his wealth on maintaining his court and household, including many of the building works he undertook on royal palaces.

He hung 2, tapestries in his palaces; by comparison, James V of Scotland hung just This income came from the Crown lands that Henry owned as well as from customs duties like tonnage and poundage , granted by parliament to the king for life.

Indeed, war and Henry's dynastic ambitions in Europe exhausted the surplus he had inherited from his father by the mids. Henry VII had not involved Parliament in his affairs very much, but Henry VIII had to turn to Parliament during his reign for money, in particular for grants of subsidies to fund his wars.

Cromwell debased the currency more significantly, starting in Ireland in The English pound halved in value against the Flemish pound between and as a result.

The nominal profit made was significant, helping to bring income and expenditure together, but it had a catastrophic effect on the country's economy.

In part, it helped to bring about a period of very high inflation from onwards. Henry is generally credited with initiating the English Reformation—the process of transforming England from a Catholic country to a Protestant one—though his progress at the elite and mass levels is disputed, [] and the precise narrative not widely agreed upon.

Yet as E. Woodward put it, Henry's determination to divorce Catherine was the occasion rather than the cause of the English Reformation so that "neither too much nor too little must be made of this divorce".

Pollard has argued that even if Henry had not needed an annulment, he might have come to reject papal control over the governance of England purely for political reasons.

Indeed, Henry needed a son to secure the Tudor Dynasty and avert the risk of civil war over disputed succession. In any case, between and , Henry instituted a number of statutes that dealt with the relationship between king and pope and hence the structure of the nascent Church of England.

The Ecclesiastical Appointments Act required the clergy to elect bishops nominated by the Sovereign. The Act of Supremacy in declared that the king was "the only Supreme Head on Earth of the Church of England" and the Treasons Act made it high treason, punishable by death, to refuse the Oath of Supremacy acknowledging the king as such.

Similarly, following the passage of the Act of Succession , all adults in the kingdom were required to acknowledge the Act's provisions declaring Henry's marriage to Anne legitimate and his marriage to Catherine illegitimate by oath; [] those who refused were subject to imprisonment for life, and any publisher or printer of any literature alleging that the marriage to Anne was invalid subject to the death penalty.

To Cromwell's annoyance, Henry insisted on parliamentary time to discuss questions of faith, which he achieved through the Duke of Norfolk.

This led to the passing of the Act of Six Articles , whereby six major questions were all answered by asserting the religious orthodoxy, thus restraining the reform movement in England.

Henry established a new political theology of obedience to the crown that continued for the next decade. It reflected Martin Luther 's new interpretation of the fourth commandment "Honour thy father and mother" , brought to England by William Tyndale.

The founding of royal authority on the Ten Commandments was another important shift: reformers within the Church used the Commandments' emphasis on faith and the word of God, while conservatives emphasised the need for dedication to God and doing good.

The reformers' efforts lay behind the publication of the Great Bible in in English. Many fled abroad, including the influential Tyndale, [] who was eventually executed and his body burned at Henry's behest.

When taxes once payable to Rome were transferred to the Crown, Cromwell saw the need to assess the taxable value of the Church's extensive holdings as they stood in The result was an extensive compendium, the Valor Ecclesiasticus.

The visitation focussed almost exclusively on the country's religious houses, with largely negative conclusions.

The result was to encourage self-dissolution. By January no such houses remained; had been dissolved. The programme was designed primarily to create a landed gentry beholden to the crown, which would use the lands much more efficiently.

Response to the reforms was mixed. The religious houses had been the only support of the impoverished, [] and the reforms alienated much of the populace outside London, helping to provoke the great northern rising of —37, known as the Pilgrimage of Grace.

They reemerged during the reign of Henry's daughter Mary — Apart from permanent garrisons at Berwick , Calais, and Carlisle , England's standing army numbered only a few hundred men.

This was increased only slightly by Henry. But the difference in capability was at this stage not significant, and Henry's forces had new armour and weaponry.

They were also supported by battlefield artillery and the war wagon , [] relatively new innovations, and several large and expensive siege guns.

Henry's break with Rome incurred the threat of a large-scale French or Spanish invasion. He also strengthened existing coastal defence fortresses such as Dover Castle and, at Dover, Moat Bulwark and Archcliffe Fort, which he visited for a few months to supervise.

Henry is traditionally cited as one of the founders of the Royal Navy. His contribution to larger vessels, if any, is unknown, but it is believed that he influenced the design of rowbarges and similar galleys.

At the beginning of Henry's reign, Ireland was effectively divided into three zones: the Pale , where English rule was unchallenged; Leinster and Munster , the so-called "obedient land" of Anglo-Irish peers; and the Gaelic Connaught and Ulster , with merely nominal English rule.

Butler proved unable to control opposition, including that of Kildare. Kildare was appointed chief governor in , resuming his dispute with Butler, which had before been in a lull.

Meanwhile, the Earl of Desmond , an Anglo-Irish peer, had turned his support to Richard de la Pole as pretender to the English throne; when in Kildare failed to take suitable actions against him, Kildare was once again removed from his post.

The Desmond situation was resolved on his death in , which was followed by a period of uncertainty. This was effectively ended with the appointment of Henry FitzRoy, Duke of Richmond and the king's son, as lord lieutenant.

Richmond had never before visited Ireland, his appointment a break with past policy. Kildare, on the other hand, was summoned to London; after some hesitation, he departed for London in , where he would face charges of treason.

Offaly had the Archbishop of Dublin murdered, and besieged Dublin. Offaly led a mixture of Pale gentry and Irish tribes, although he failed to secure the support of Lord Darcy , a sympathiser, or Charles V.

What was effectively a civil war was ended with the intervention of 2, English troops — a large army by Irish standards — and the execution of Offaly his father was already dead and his uncles.

Although the Offaly revolt was followed by a determination to rule Ireland more closely, Henry was wary of drawn-out conflict with the tribes, and a royal commission recommended that the only relationship with the tribes was to be promises of peace, their land protected from English expansion.

This change did, however, also allow a policy of peaceful reconciliation and expansion: the Lords of Ireland would grant their lands to the King, before being returned as fiefdoms.

The incentive to comply with Henry's request was an accompanying barony, and thus a right to sit in the Irish House of Lords, which was to run in parallel with England's.

The complexities and sheer scale of Henry's legacy ensured that, in the words of Betteridge and Freeman, "throughout the centuries, Henry has been praised and reviled, but he has never been ignored".

Mackie sums up Henry's personality and its impact on his achievements and popularity:. The respect, nay even the popularity, which he had from his people was not unmerited He kept the development of England in line with some of the most vigorous, though not the noblest forces of the day.

His high courage — highest when things went ill — his commanding intellect, his appreciation of fact, and his instinct for rule carried his country through a perilous time of change, and his very arrogance saved his people from the wars which afflicted other lands.

Dimly remembering the wars of the Roses, vaguely informed as to the slaughters and sufferings in Europe, the people of England knew that in Henry they had a great king.

A particular focus of modern historiography has been the extent to which the events of Henry's life including his marriages, foreign policy and religious changes were the result of his own initiative and, if they were, whether they were the result of opportunism or of a principled undertaking by Henry.

Pollard , who in presented his own, largely positive, view of the king, lauding him, "as the king and statesman who, whatever his personal failings, led England down the road to parliamentary democracy and empire".

Elton in Elton's book on The Tudor Revolution in Government , maintained Pollard's positive interpretation of the Henrician period as a whole, but reinterpreted Henry himself as a follower rather than a leader.

For Elton, it was Cromwell and not Henry who undertook the changes in government — Henry was shrewd, but lacked the vision to follow a complex plan through.

Although the central tenets of Elton's thesis have since been questioned, it has consistently provided the starting point for much later work, including that of J.

Scarisbrick , his student. Scarisbrick largely kept Elton's regard for Cromwell's abilities, but returned agency to Henry, who Scarisbrick considered to have ultimately directed and shaped policy.

This lack of clarity about Henry's control over events has contributed to the variation in the qualities ascribed to him: religious conservative or dangerous radical; lover of beauty or brutal destroyer of priceless artefacts; friend and patron or betrayer of those around him; chivalry incarnate or ruthless chauvinist.

Many changes were made to the royal style during his reign. Henry's motto was "Coeur Loyal" "true heart" , and he had this embroidered on his clothes in the form of a heart symbol and with the word "loyal".

His emblem was the Tudor rose and the Beaufort portcullis. In , the phrase "of the Church of England" changed to "of the Church of England and also of Ireland ".

In , Henry had the Irish Parliament change the title "Lord of Ireland" to "King of Ireland" with the Crown of Ireland Act , after being advised that many Irish people regarded the Pope as the true head of their country, with the Lord acting as a mere representative.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. King of England. Catherine of Aragon. Anne Boleyn. Jane Seymour. Anne of Cleves. Catherine Howard.

Catherine Parr. Jane Seymour left became Henry's third wife, pictured at right with Henry and the young Prince Edward , c. At the time that this was painted, Henry was married to his sixth wife, Catherine Parr.

Main article: Dissolution of the Monasteries. Main article: Rough Wooing. See also: Third Succession Act. Main article: English Reformation.

Henry's armorial during his early reign left and later reign right. Owen Tudor 4. Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond 9. Catherine of Valois 2.

Henry VII of England John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset 5. Margaret Beaufort Margaret Beauchamp 1. Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York 6.

Edward IV of England Cecily Neville 3. Elizabeth of York Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers 7. Elizabeth Woodville Jacquetta of Luxembourg.

Biography portal Monarchy portal England portal Christianity portal. Grene growith the holy Anne Boleyn: Fatal Attractions.

Yale University Press. Elton puts the date the bull was made official as November About the Series. Behind the Scenes PBS". Retrieved 17 July St Catherine's Press.

Under Duke of Cornwall, which was his title when he succeeded his brother as Prince of Wales. Reviews in History. Retrieved 5 April Cambridge University Press.

Tudor and Stuart Britain: — Retrieved 13 July The King had no further use for Wolsey, who had failed to procure the annulment of his marriage, and he summoned Parliament in order that an act of attainder should be passed against the cardinal.

The act was not needed, however, for Wolsey had also been commanded to appear before the common-law judges and answer the charge that by publishing his bulls of appointment as papal legate he had infringed the Statute of Praemunire.

Eerdmans Publishing. Henry decided to turn to the archbishop of Canterbury for the annulment, but Wolsey, recognizing that it was too late, opposed this move.

Henry discharged him and appointed his friend Sir Thomas More as chancellor, confident that More would support him.

More refused to make any statement for or against the annulment. When pressed to do so he resigned as the chancellor and retired to private life.

He had such a reputation for integrity that his endorsement would have engendered huge support for the annulment among Parliament and the people, who loved Catherine.

More's silence so angered Henry that he tried to force his hand by having him imprisoned and tried. The perfidy of the king's secretary, Thomas Cromwell, however, and the perjury of a petty bureaucrat, Richard Rich, brought about More's conviction and execution for treason in Meanwhile, a respected Cambridge scholar priest, Tomas Cranmer, supported Henry and sought support for him from the European universities.

Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 9 November Amberley Publishing. A Brief History of the English Reformation. Cromwell, with his usual single-minded and ruthless efficiency, organised the interrogation of the accused, their trials and their executions.

Cranmer was absolutely shattered by the 'revelation' of the queen's misdeeds. He wrote to the king expressing his difficulty in believing her guilt.

But he fell into line and pronounced the annulment of Henry's second marriage on the grounds of Anne's pre-contract to another. The Independent.

Retrieved 25 August Retrieved 25 March Young and Damned and Fair. Los Angeles Times. Windsor Castle: College of St George.

Archived from the original PDF on 2 May Retrieved 12 March In July, Anne's brother, Lord Rochford, was sent on a diplomatic mission to France to ask for the postponement of a meeting between Henry VIII and Francis I because of Anne's condition: "being so far gone with child she could not cross the sea with the King".

Chapuys backs this up in a letter dated 27 July, where he refers to Anne's pregnancy. We do not know what happened with this pregnancy as there is no evidence of the outcome.

Dewhurst writes of how the pregnancy could have resulted in a miscarriage or stillbirth, but there is no evidence to support this, he therefore wonders if it was a case of pseudocyesis, a false pregnancy, caused by the stress that Anne was under — the pressure to provide a son.

Chapuys wrote on 27 September "Since the King began to doubt whether his lady was enceinte or not, he has renewed and increased the love he formerly had for a beautiful damsel of the court".

However, Dewhurst thinks that there is an error in the dating of this letter as the editor of the Lisle Letters states that this letter is actually from or because it also refers to Sir Christopher Garneys, a man who died in October Archived from the original on 15 June Retrieved 14 April A History Of England.

Mackie The Earlier Tudors, — London: Vintage Books. Arnold, Thomas The Renaissance at War. Ashrafian, Hutan Archived from the original on 2 January Bernard, G.

Betteridge, Thomas Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Betteridge, Thomas; Freeman, Thomas S. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. Brigden, Susan New Worlds, Lost Worlds.

Chibi, Andrew A. Journal of Church and State. Churchill, Winston The New World. History of the English Speaking Peoples.

Cassell and Company. Crofton, Ian The Kings and Queens of England. Quercus Books. Cruz, Anne J. University of Illinois Press. Davies, Jonathan Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research.

Elton, G. Reform and Reformation: England, — Edward Arnold. Farquhar, Michael A Treasure of Royal Scandals. Penguin Books. Fraser, Antonia Vintage Books.

Guicciardini, Francesco Alexander, Sidney ed. The History of Italy. Princeton University Press. Gunn, Steven History Today. Guy, John The Tudor monarchy.

Arnold Publishers. Guy, John A. The Tudors: a Very Short Introduction. Harrison, William; Edelen, Georges [].

Dover Publications Inc. Hays, J. Rutgers University Press. Wolsey enjoyed a lavish existence under Henry, but when Wolsey failed to deliver Henry's quick annulment from Catherine, the cardinal quickly fell out of favor.

After 16 years of power, Wolsey was arrested and falsely charged with treason. He subsequently died in custody.

Henry's actions upon Wolsey gave a strong signal to the pope that he would not honor the wishes of even the highest clergy and would instead exercise full power in every realm of his court.

After Henry declared his supremacy, the Christian church separated, forming the Church of England. Henry instituted several statutes that outlined the relationship between the king and the pope and the structure of the Church of England: the Act of Appeals, the Acts of Succession and the first Act of Supremacy, declaring the king was "the only Supreme Head in Earth of the Church of England.

These macro reforms trickled down to minute details of worship. Henry ordered the clergy to preach against superstitious images, relics, miracles and pilgrimages, and to remove almost all candles from religious settings.

His catechism, called the King's Primer , left out the saints. Fully separated now from the pope, the Church of England was under England's rule, not Rome's.

From to , a great northern uprising known as the Pilgrimage of Grace took hold, during which 30, people rebelled against the king's changes.

It was the only major threat to Henry's authority as monarch. The rebellion's leader, Robert Aske, and others were executed.

The pope conceded, but the official marriage of Henry and Catherine was postponed until the death of Henry VII in His philandering ways were tame by the standards of his contemporaries, but they nonetheless resulted in his first divorce in Because Catherine was now 42 and unable to conceive another child, Henry set on a mission to obtain a male heir by configuring a way to officially abandon his marriage with Catherine.

The Book of Leviticus stated that a man who takes his brother's wife shall remain childless. Though Catherine had borne him a child, that child was a girl, which, in Henry's logic, did not count.

He petitioned the pope for an annulment but was refused due to pressure from Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, Catherine's nephew. The debate, during which Catherine fought mightily to maintain both her own and her daughter's titles, lasted for six years.

In , Anne Boleyn, who was still Henry's mistress, became pregnant. Henry decided he didn't need the pope's permission on matters of the Church of England.

Thomas Cranmer, the new archbishop of Canterbury, presided over the trial that declared his first marriage annulled. Inside the court, however, Queen Anne suffered greatly from her failure to produce a living male heir.

After she miscarried twice, Henry became interested in one of Anne's ladies-in-waiting, Jane Seymour. In an all-out effort to leave his unfruitful marriage, Henry contrived an elaborate story that Anne had committed adultery, had incestuous relations and was plotting to murder him.

Henry charged three men on account of their adultery with his wife, and on May 15, , he put her on trial. Anne, regal and calm, denied all charges against her.

Four days later, Henry's marriage to Anne was annulled and declared invalid. Anne was then taken to the Tower Green, where she was beheaded in private on May 19, However, Jane was never officially coronated or crowned queen.

Just nine days after giving birth, Jane died from a pregnancy-related infection. He and his court mourned for an extended period of time after her passing.

Three years after the death of Jane Seymour, Henry was ready to marry again, mainly to ensure the succession of his crown.

He inquired in foreign courts about the appearances of available women. Anne, the sister of the Duke of Cleves, was suggested.

The German artist Hans Holbein the Younger, who served as the king's official painter, was sent out to create a portrait of her. However after the couple married, in January , Henry disapproved of Anne in the flesh and divorced her after six months.

Within weeks of his divorce to Anne of Cleves, Henry married the very young Catherine Howard, a first cousin of Anne Boleyn, in a private marriage on July 28, Henry, 49, and Catherine, 19, started out a happy pair.

Henry was now dealing with tremendous weight gain and a bad leg, and his new wife gave him zest for life. He repaid her with lavish gifts. Happiness would not last long for the couple.

Catherine began seeking the attention of men her own age—a tremendously dangerous endeavor for the queen of England.

Henry 8

Henry himself displayed no military talent, but a real victory was won by the earl of Surrey at Flodden against a Scottish invasion. Despite the obvious pointlessness of the fighting, the appearance of success was popular.

Moreover, in Thomas Wolsey , who organized his first campaign in France, Henry discovered his first outstanding minister.

The cardinal had some occasional ambition for the papal tiara, and this Henry supported; Wolsey at Rome would have been a powerful card in English hands.

That event altered the European situation. In Charles, the crowns of Spain, Burgundy with the Netherlands , and Austria were united in an overwhelming complex of power that reduced all the dynasties of Europe, with the exception of France, to an inferior position.

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An initial joint Anglo-Spanish attack was planned for the spring to recover Aquitaine for England, the start of making Henry's dreams of ruling France a reality.

Nevertheless, the French were pushed out of Italy soon after, and the alliance survived, with both parties keen to win further victories over the French.

On 30 June , Henry invaded France, and his troops defeated a French army at the Battle of the Spurs — a relatively minor result, but one which was seized on by the English for propaganda purposes.

However, despite initial indications, he decided not to pursue a campaign. He had been supporting Ferdinand and Maximilian financially during the campaign but had received little in return; England's coffers were now empty.

Charles V ascended the thrones of both Spain and the Holy Roman Empire following the deaths of his grandfathers, Ferdinand in and Maximilian in Francis I likewise became king of France upon the death of Louis in , [50] leaving three relatively young rulers and an opportunity for a clean slate.

The careful diplomacy of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey had resulted in the Treaty of London in , aimed at uniting the kingdoms of western Europe in the wake of a new Ottoman threat, and it seemed that peace might be secured.

Both hoped for friendly relations in place of the wars of the previous decade. The strong air of competition laid to rest any hopes of a renewal of the Treaty of London, however, and conflict was inevitable.

Charles brought the Empire into war with France in ; Henry offered to mediate, but little was achieved and by the end of the year Henry had aligned England with Charles.

He still clung to his previous aim of restoring English lands in France, but also sought to secure an alliance with Burgundy , then part of Charles' realm, and the continued support of Charles.

Charles defeated and captured Francis at Pavia and could dictate peace; but he believed he owed Henry nothing. Sensing this, Henry decided to take England out of the war before his ally, signing the Treaty of the More on 30 August There has been speculation that Mary's two children, Henry Carey and Catherine Carey , were fathered by Henry, but this has never been proved, and the King never acknowledged them as he did in the case of Henry FitzRoy.

These options were legitimising Henry FitzRoy, which would take the intervention of the pope and would be open to challenge; marrying off Mary as soon as possible and hoping for a grandson to inherit directly, but Mary was considered unlikely to conceive before Henry's death; or somehow rejecting Catherine and marrying someone else of child-bearing age.

Probably seeing the possibility of marrying Anne, the third was ultimately the most attractive possibility to the year-old Henry, [60] and it soon became the King's absorbing desire to annul his marriage to the now year-old Catherine.

Henry's precise motivations and intentions over the coming years are not widely agreed on. Certainly, by he had convinced himself that Catherine had produced no male heir because their union was "blighted in the eyes of God".

It was this argument Henry took to Pope Clement VII in in the hope of having his marriage to Catherine annulled, forgoing at least one less openly defiant line of attack.

Knight was unsuccessful; the Pope could not be misled so easily. Other missions concentrated on arranging an ecclesiastical court to meet in England, with a representative from Clement VII.

Though Clement agreed to the creation of such a court, he never had any intention of empowering his legate, Lorenzo Campeggio , to decide in Henry's favour.

After less than two months of hearing evidence, Clement called the case back to Rome in July , from which it was clear that it would never re-emerge.

He was charged with praemunire in October [67] and his fall from grace was "sudden and total". Intelligent and able, but also a devout Catholic and opponent of the annulment, [70] More initially cooperated with the king's new policy, denouncing Wolsey in Parliament.

A year later, Catherine was banished from court, and her rooms were given to Anne. Anne was an unusually educated and intellectual woman for her time, and was keenly absorbed and engaged with the ideas of the Protestant Reformers, though the extent to which she herself was a committed Protestant is much debated.

Henry was married to Catherine for 24 years. Their divorce has been described as a "deeply wounding and isolating" experience for Henry.

In the winter of , Henry met with Francis I at Calais and enlisted the support of the French king for his new marriage. On 23 May , Cranmer, sitting in judgment at a special court convened at Dunstable Priory to rule on the validity of the king's marriage to Catherine of Aragon, declared the marriage of Henry and Catherine null and void.

Five days later, on 28 May , Cranmer declared the marriage of Henry and Anne to be valid. In her place, Anne was crowned queen consort on 1 June The child was christened Elizabeth , in honour of Henry's mother, Elizabeth of York.

Following the marriage, there was a period of consolidation, taking the form of a series of statutes of the Reformation Parliament aimed at finding solutions to any remaining issues, whilst protecting the new reforms from challenge, convincing the public of their legitimacy, and exposing and dealing with opponents.

The king and queen were not pleased with married life. The royal couple enjoyed periods of calm and affection, but Anne refused to play the submissive role expected of her.

The vivacity and opinionated intellect that had made her so attractive as an illicit lover made her too independent for the largely ceremonial role of a royal wife and it made her many enemies.

For his part, Henry disliked Anne's constant irritability and violent temper. After a false pregnancy or miscarriage in , he saw her failure to give him a son as a betrayal.

As early as Christmas , Henry was discussing with Cranmer and Cromwell the chances of leaving Anne without having to return to Catherine.

Opposition to Henry's religious policies was quickly suppressed in England. A number of dissenting monks, including the first Carthusian Martyrs , were executed and many more pilloried.

Fisher openly rejected Henry as the Supreme Head of the Church, but More was careful to avoid openly breaking the Treasons Act of , which unlike later acts did not forbid mere silence.

Both men were subsequently convicted of high treason, however — More on the evidence of a single conversation with Richard Rich , the Solicitor General.

Both were duly executed in the summer of These suppressions, as well as the Dissolution of the Lesser Monasteries Act of , in turn contributed to more general resistance to Henry's reforms, most notably in the Pilgrimage of Grace , a large uprising in northern England in October Aske told the rebels they had been successful and they could disperse and go home.

In total, about rebels were executed, and the disturbances ended. On 8 January , news reached the king and the queen that Catherine of Aragon had died.

The following day, Henry dressed all in yellow, with a white feather in his bonnet. Later that month, the King was unhorsed in a tournament and was badly injured; it seemed for a time that his life was in danger.

When news of this accident reached the queen, she was sent into shock and miscarried a male child at about 15 weeks' gestation, on the day of Catherine's funeral, 29 January Although the Boleyn family still held important positions on the Privy Council , Anne had many enemies, including the Duke of Suffolk.

Even her own uncle, the Duke of Norfolk, had come to resent her attitude to her power. The Boleyns preferred France over the Emperor as a potential ally, but the King's favour had swung towards the latter partly because of Cromwell , damaging the family's influence.

A second annulment was now a real possibility, although it is commonly believed that it was Cromwell's anti-Boleyn influence that led opponents to look for a way of having her executed.

Anne's downfall came shortly after she had recovered from her final miscarriage. Whether it was primarily the result of allegations of conspiracy, adultery, or witchcraft remains a matter of debate among historians.

Anne was also arrested, accused of treasonous adultery and incest. Although the evidence against them was unconvincing, the accused were found guilty and condemned to death.

George Boleyn and the other accused men were executed on 17 May The day after Anne's execution in the year-old Henry became engaged to Seymour, who had been one of the Queen's ladies-in-waiting.

At the time, Henry recovered quickly from the shock. With Charles V distracted by the internal politics of his many kingdoms and external threats, and Henry and Francis on relatively good terms, domestic and not foreign policy issues had been Henry's priority in the first half of the s.

In , for example, Henry granted his assent to the Laws in Wales Act , which legally annexed Wales , uniting England and Wales into a single nation.

This was followed by the Second Succession Act the Act of Succession , which declared Henry's children by Jane to be next in the line of succession and declared both Mary and Elizabeth illegitimate, thus excluding them from the throne.

The king was also granted the power to further determine the line of succession in his will, should he have no further issue. Having considered the matter, Cromwell suggested Anne , the year-old sister of the Duke of Cleves , who was seen as an important ally in case of a Roman Catholic attack on England, for the duke fell between Lutheranism and Catholicism.

Despite his role, he was never formally accused of being responsible for Henry's failed marriage. On 28 July the same day Cromwell was executed , Henry married the young Catherine Howard , a first cousin and lady-in-waiting of Anne Boleyn.

She also employed Francis Dereham , who had previously been informally engaged to her and had an affair with her prior to her marriage, as her secretary.

The court was informed of her affair with Dereham whilst Henry was away; they dispatched Thomas Cranmer to investigate, who brought evidence of Queen Catherine's previous affair with Dereham to the king's notice.

It took another meeting of the council, however, before Henry believed the accusations against Dereham and went into a rage, blaming the council before consoling himself in hunting.

Dereham, meanwhile, exposed Queen Catherine's relationship with Culpeper. Culpeper and Dereham were both executed, and Catherine too was beheaded on 13 February In , the chief minister Thomas Cromwell pursued an extensive campaign against what his government termed "idolatry" practiced under the old religion, culminating in September with the dismantling of the shrine of St.

Thomas Becket at Canterbury. In , England's remaining monasteries were all dissolved, and their property transferred to the Crown.

Abbots and priors lost their seats in the House of Lords ; only archbishops and bishops remained. Consequently, the Lords Spiritual —as members of the clergy with seats in the House of Lords were known—were for the first time outnumbered by the Lords Temporal.

The alliance between Francis and Charles had soured, eventually degenerating into renewed war. With Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn dead, relations between Charles and Henry improved considerably, and Henry concluded a secret alliance with the Emperor and decided to enter the Italian War in favour of his new ally.

An invasion of France was planned for Henry now hoped to unite the crowns of England and Scotland by marrying his son Edward to James' successor, Mary.

The result was eight years of war between England and Scotland, a campaign later dubbed "the Rough Wooing ". Despite several peace treaties, unrest continued in Scotland until Henry's death.

Despite the early success with Scotland, Henry hesitated to invade France, annoying Charles. Henry finally went to France in June with a two-pronged attack.

One force under Norfolk ineffectively besieged Montreuil. The other, under Suffolk, laid siege to Boulogne. Henry later took personal command, and Boulogne fell on 18 September Charles' own campaign fizzled, and he made peace with France that same day.

Francis attempted to invade England in the summer of , but reached only the Isle of Wight before being repulsed in the Battle of the Solent.

Henry secured Boulogne for eight years. Henry married his last wife, the wealthy widow Catherine Parr , in July Henry remained committed to an idiosyncratic mixture of Catholicism and Protestantism; the reactionary mood that had gained ground after Cromwell's fall had neither eliminated his Protestant streak nor been overcome by it.

The same act allowed Henry to determine further succession to the throne in his will. He was covered with painful, pus -filled boils and possibly suffered from gout.

His obesity and other medical problems can be traced to the jousting accident in in which he suffered a leg wound.

The accident reopened and aggravated an injury he had sustained years earlier, to the extent that his doctors found it difficult to treat.

The chronic wound festered for the remainder of his life and became ulcerated , preventing him from maintaining the level of physical activity he had previously enjoyed.

The jousting accident is also believed to have caused Henry's mood swings , which may have had a dramatic effect on his personality and temperament.

The theory that Henry suffered from syphilis has been dismissed by most historians. This analysis identifies growth hormone deficiency GHD as the reason for his increased adiposity but also significant behavioural changes noted in his later years, including his multiple marriages.

Henry's obesity hastened his death at the age of 55, on 28 January in the Palace of Whitehall , on what would have been his father's 90th birthday.

The tomb he had planned with components taken from the tomb intended for Cardinal Wolsey was only partly constructed and was never completed.

The sarcophagus and its base were later removed and used for Lord Nelson 's tomb in the crypt of St. Paul's Cathedral.

What is extraordinary is that Henry was usually a very good husband. And he liked women—that's why he married so many of them!

He was very tender to them, we know that he addressed them as "sweetheart. He was immensely considerate when they were pregnant. But, once he had fallen out of love He just withdrew.

He abandoned them. They didn't even know he'd left them. Upon Henry's death, he was succeeded by his son Edward VI. Since Edward was then only nine years old, he could not rule directly.

Instead, Henry's will designated 16 executors to serve on a council of regency until Edward reached If Mary's issue failed, the crown was to go to Elizabeth, Henry's daughter by Anne Boleyn, and her heirs.

Finally, if Elizabeth's line became extinct, the crown was to be inherited by the descendants of Henry VIII's deceased younger sister, Mary, the Greys.

The descendants of Henry's sister Margaret—the Stuarts, rulers of Scotland—were thereby excluded from the succession.

Henry cultivated the image of a Renaissance man , and his court was a centre of scholarly and artistic innovation and glamorous excess, epitomised by the Field of the Cloth of Gold.

He scouted the country for choirboys, taking some directly from Wolsey's choir, and introduced Renaissance music into court.

He was skilled on the lute and played the organ, and was a talented player of the virginals. Henry was an avid gambler and dice player, and excelled at sports, especially jousting, hunting, and real tennis.

He was also known for his strong defence of conventional Christian piety. Henry was an intellectual, the first English king with a modern humanist education.

He read and wrote English, French, and Latin, and owned a large library. He annotated many books and published one of his own, and he had numerous pamphlets and lectures prepared to support the reformation of the church.

Richard Sampson's Oratio , for example, was an argument for absolute obedience to the monarchy and claimed that the English church had always been independent from Rome.

Henry was a large, well-built athlete, over 6 feet [1. His athletic activities were more than pastimes; they were political devices that served multiple goals, enhancing his image, impressing foreign emissaries and rulers, and conveying his ability to suppress any rebellion.

He arranged a jousting tournament at Greenwich in where he wore gilded armour and gilded horse trappings, and outfits of velvet, satin, and cloth of gold with pearls and jewels.

It suitably impressed foreign ambassadors, one of whom wrote home that "the wealth and civilisation of the world are here, and those who call the English barbarians appear to me to render themselves such".

He then started adding weight and lost the trim, athletic figure that had made him so handsome, and his courtiers began dressing in heavily padded clothes to emulate and flatter him.

His health rapidly declined near the end of his reign. The power of Tudor monarchs, including Henry, was 'whole' and 'entire', ruling, as they claimed, by the grace of God alone.

These included acts of diplomacy including royal marriages , declarations of war, management of the coinage, the issue of royal pardons and the power to summon and dissolve parliament as and when required.

In practice, Tudor monarchs used patronage to maintain a royal court that included formal institutions such as the Privy Council as well as more informal advisers and confidants.

Elton has argued that one such minister, Thomas Cromwell, led a "Tudor revolution in government" independently of the king, whom Elton presented as an opportunistic, essentially lazy participant in the nitty-gritty of politics.

Where Henry did intervene personally in the running of the country, Elton argued, he mostly did so to its detriment.

From to , Thomas Wolsey — , a cardinal of the established Church, oversaw domestic and foreign policy for the king from his position as Lord Chancellor.

The Star Chamber's overall structure remained unchanged, but Wolsey used it to provide much-needed reform of the criminal law. The power of the court itself did not outlive Wolsey, however, since no serious administrative reform was undertaken and its role eventually devolved to the localities.

Thomas Cromwell c. Returning to England from the continent in or , Cromwell soon entered Wolsey's service.

He turned to law, also picking up a good knowledge of the Bible, and was admitted to Gray's Inn in He became Wolsey's "man of all work".

By , Cromwell and his associates were already responsible for the drafting of much legislation. Cromwell did much work through his many offices to remove the tasks of government from the Royal Household and ideologically from the personal body of the King and into a public state.

Henry inherited a vast fortune and a prosperous economy from his father, who had been frugal. He augmented the royal treasury by seizing church lands, but his heavy spending and long periods of mismanagement damaged the economy.

Henry spent much of his wealth on maintaining his court and household, including many of the building works he undertook on royal palaces.

He hung 2, tapestries in his palaces; by comparison, James V of Scotland hung just This income came from the Crown lands that Henry owned as well as from customs duties like tonnage and poundage , granted by parliament to the king for life.

Indeed, war and Henry's dynastic ambitions in Europe exhausted the surplus he had inherited from his father by the mids.

Henry VII had not involved Parliament in his affairs very much, but Henry VIII had to turn to Parliament during his reign for money, in particular for grants of subsidies to fund his wars.

Cromwell debased the currency more significantly, starting in Ireland in The English pound halved in value against the Flemish pound between and as a result.

The nominal profit made was significant, helping to bring income and expenditure together, but it had a catastrophic effect on the country's economy.

In part, it helped to bring about a period of very high inflation from onwards. Henry is generally credited with initiating the English Reformation—the process of transforming England from a Catholic country to a Protestant one—though his progress at the elite and mass levels is disputed, [] and the precise narrative not widely agreed upon.

Yet as E. Woodward put it, Henry's determination to divorce Catherine was the occasion rather than the cause of the English Reformation so that "neither too much nor too little must be made of this divorce".

Pollard has argued that even if Henry had not needed an annulment, he might have come to reject papal control over the governance of England purely for political reasons.

Indeed, Henry needed a son to secure the Tudor Dynasty and avert the risk of civil war over disputed succession. In any case, between and , Henry instituted a number of statutes that dealt with the relationship between king and pope and hence the structure of the nascent Church of England.

The Ecclesiastical Appointments Act required the clergy to elect bishops nominated by the Sovereign.

The Act of Supremacy in declared that the king was "the only Supreme Head on Earth of the Church of England" and the Treasons Act made it high treason, punishable by death, to refuse the Oath of Supremacy acknowledging the king as such.

Similarly, following the passage of the Act of Succession , all adults in the kingdom were required to acknowledge the Act's provisions declaring Henry's marriage to Anne legitimate and his marriage to Catherine illegitimate by oath; [] those who refused were subject to imprisonment for life, and any publisher or printer of any literature alleging that the marriage to Anne was invalid subject to the death penalty.

To Cromwell's annoyance, Henry insisted on parliamentary time to discuss questions of faith, which he achieved through the Duke of Norfolk. This led to the passing of the Act of Six Articles , whereby six major questions were all answered by asserting the religious orthodoxy, thus restraining the reform movement in England.

Henry established a new political theology of obedience to the crown that continued for the next decade.

It reflected Martin Luther 's new interpretation of the fourth commandment "Honour thy father and mother" , brought to England by William Tyndale.

The founding of royal authority on the Ten Commandments was another important shift: reformers within the Church used the Commandments' emphasis on faith and the word of God, while conservatives emphasised the need for dedication to God and doing good.

The reformers' efforts lay behind the publication of the Great Bible in in English. Many fled abroad, including the influential Tyndale, [] who was eventually executed and his body burned at Henry's behest.

When taxes once payable to Rome were transferred to the Crown, Cromwell saw the need to assess the taxable value of the Church's extensive holdings as they stood in The result was an extensive compendium, the Valor Ecclesiasticus.

The visitation focussed almost exclusively on the country's religious houses, with largely negative conclusions.

The result was to encourage self-dissolution. By January no such houses remained; had been dissolved. The programme was designed primarily to create a landed gentry beholden to the crown, which would use the lands much more efficiently.

Response to the reforms was mixed. The religious houses had been the only support of the impoverished, [] and the reforms alienated much of the populace outside London, helping to provoke the great northern rising of —37, known as the Pilgrimage of Grace.

They reemerged during the reign of Henry's daughter Mary — Apart from permanent garrisons at Berwick , Calais, and Carlisle , England's standing army numbered only a few hundred men.

This was increased only slightly by Henry. But the difference in capability was at this stage not significant, and Henry's forces had new armour and weaponry.

They were also supported by battlefield artillery and the war wagon , [] relatively new innovations, and several large and expensive siege guns.

Henry's break with Rome incurred the threat of a large-scale French or Spanish invasion. He also strengthened existing coastal defence fortresses such as Dover Castle and, at Dover, Moat Bulwark and Archcliffe Fort, which he visited for a few months to supervise.

Henry is traditionally cited as one of the founders of the Royal Navy. His contribution to larger vessels, if any, is unknown, but it is believed that he influenced the design of rowbarges and similar galleys.

At the beginning of Henry's reign, Ireland was effectively divided into three zones: the Pale , where English rule was unchallenged; Leinster and Munster , the so-called "obedient land" of Anglo-Irish peers; and the Gaelic Connaught and Ulster , with merely nominal English rule.

Butler proved unable to control opposition, including that of Kildare. Kildare was appointed chief governor in , resuming his dispute with Butler, which had before been in a lull.

Meanwhile, the Earl of Desmond , an Anglo-Irish peer, had turned his support to Richard de la Pole as pretender to the English throne; when in Kildare failed to take suitable actions against him, Kildare was once again removed from his post.

The Desmond situation was resolved on his death in , which was followed by a period of uncertainty. This was effectively ended with the appointment of Henry FitzRoy, Duke of Richmond and the king's son, as lord lieutenant.

Richmond had never before visited Ireland, his appointment a break with past policy. Kildare, on the other hand, was summoned to London; after some hesitation, he departed for London in , where he would face charges of treason.

Offaly had the Archbishop of Dublin murdered, and besieged Dublin. Offaly led a mixture of Pale gentry and Irish tribes, although he failed to secure the support of Lord Darcy , a sympathiser, or Charles V.

What was effectively a civil war was ended with the intervention of 2, English troops — a large army by Irish standards — and the execution of Offaly his father was already dead and his uncles.

Although the Offaly revolt was followed by a determination to rule Ireland more closely, Henry was wary of drawn-out conflict with the tribes, and a royal commission recommended that the only relationship with the tribes was to be promises of peace, their land protected from English expansion.

This change did, however, also allow a policy of peaceful reconciliation and expansion: the Lords of Ireland would grant their lands to the King, before being returned as fiefdoms.

The incentive to comply with Henry's request was an accompanying barony, and thus a right to sit in the Irish House of Lords, which was to run in parallel with England's.

The complexities and sheer scale of Henry's legacy ensured that, in the words of Betteridge and Freeman, "throughout the centuries, Henry has been praised and reviled, but he has never been ignored".

Mackie sums up Henry's personality and its impact on his achievements and popularity:. The respect, nay even the popularity, which he had from his people was not unmerited He kept the development of England in line with some of the most vigorous, though not the noblest forces of the day.

His high courage — highest when things went ill — his commanding intellect, his appreciation of fact, and his instinct for rule carried his country through a perilous time of change, and his very arrogance saved his people from the wars which afflicted other lands.

Dimly remembering the wars of the Roses, vaguely informed as to the slaughters and sufferings in Europe, the people of England knew that in Henry they had a great king.

A particular focus of modern historiography has been the extent to which the events of Henry's life including his marriages, foreign policy and religious changes were the result of his own initiative and, if they were, whether they were the result of opportunism or of a principled undertaking by Henry.

Pollard , who in presented his own, largely positive, view of the king, lauding him, "as the king and statesman who, whatever his personal failings, led England down the road to parliamentary democracy and empire".

Elton in Elton's book on The Tudor Revolution in Government , maintained Pollard's positive interpretation of the Henrician period as a whole, but reinterpreted Henry himself as a follower rather than a leader.

For Elton, it was Cromwell and not Henry who undertook the changes in government — Henry was shrewd, but lacked the vision to follow a complex plan through.

Although the central tenets of Elton's thesis have since been questioned, it has consistently provided the starting point for much later work, including that of J.

Scarisbrick , his student. Scarisbrick largely kept Elton's regard for Cromwell's abilities, but returned agency to Henry, who Scarisbrick considered to have ultimately directed and shaped policy.

This lack of clarity about Henry's control over events has contributed to the variation in the qualities ascribed to him: religious conservative or dangerous radical; lover of beauty or brutal destroyer of priceless artefacts; friend and patron or betrayer of those around him; chivalry incarnate or ruthless chauvinist.

Many changes were made to the royal style during his reign. Henry's motto was "Coeur Loyal" "true heart" , and he had this embroidered on his clothes in the form of a heart symbol and with the word "loyal".

His emblem was the Tudor rose and the Beaufort portcullis. In , the phrase "of the Church of England" changed to "of the Church of England and also of Ireland ".

In , Henry had the Irish Parliament change the title "Lord of Ireland" to "King of Ireland" with the Crown of Ireland Act , after being advised that many Irish people regarded the Pope as the true head of their country, with the Lord acting as a mere representative.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. King of England. Catherine of Aragon. Anne Boleyn. Jane Seymour. Anne of Cleves.

Catherine Howard. Catherine Parr. Jane Seymour left became Henry's third wife, pictured at right with Henry and the young Prince Edward , c. At the time that this was painted, Henry was married to his sixth wife, Catherine Parr.

Main article: Dissolution of the Monasteries. Main article: Rough Wooing. See also: Third Succession Act.

Main article: English Reformation. Henry's armorial during his early reign left and later reign right. Owen Tudor 4.

Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond 9. Catherine of Valois 2. Henry VII of England John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset 5.

Margaret Beaufort Margaret Beauchamp 1. Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York 6. Edward IV of England Cecily Neville 3.

Elizabeth of York Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers 7. Elizabeth Woodville Jacquetta of Luxembourg. Biography portal Monarchy portal England portal Christianity portal.

Grene growith the holy Anne Boleyn: Fatal Attractions. Yale University Press. Elton puts the date the bull was made official as November About the Series.

Behind the Scenes PBS". Retrieved 17 July St Catherine's Press. Under Duke of Cornwall, which was his title when he succeeded his brother as Prince of Wales.

Reviews in History. Retrieved 5 April Cambridge University Press.

Henry 8

Henry 8 - Heinrich VIII. – der übel riechende Superstar

In , Henry made an attempt to a papal annulment of his marriage to Catherine. Anne Boleyn 2. Sicher ist, dass Anne Boleyn eine Fehlgeburt einen Sohn hatte. Catherine Parr 6. Das wechselnde Dazn über Sky zwischen den verfeindeten Häusern Valois und Habsburg gab ihm Gelegenheit zu Bündnissen einmal mit dieser, dann mit jener Seite. Diese dritte 'Katharina', war herzlich, gewinnend, und scharfsinnig. Katharina von Valois — Heinrich heiratete erst am 6. Pikmin 4 beiden Kusinen liegen nebeneinander in der Kapelle des Towers begraben. Kategorien : Literarisches Werk Literatur Schon wurde eine Intrige gesponnen. Henry VIII. wurde am Juni als Sohn des englischen Königs Henry VII. Tudor geboren. Da sein älterer Bruder Arthur starb, übernahm Henry nach dem. Entdecken Sie Henry VIII. [2 DVDs] und weitere TV-Serien auf DVD- & Blu-ray in unserem vielfältigen Angebot. Gratis Lieferung möglich. "Geschieden, Geköpft, Gestorben, Geschieden, Geköpft, Überlebt" ist der Abzählreim, den englische Kinder noch heute zu den sechs Ehefrauen von Henry VIII. Henry 8 Hoak, Dale Henry VIII 2nd ed. Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article requires login. He Kinox How Met Your Mother immensely considerate when they were pregnant. She sought to return England to the Catholic The reason for all the appointments to a small Tyll Ulenspiegel Fritz Bachschmidt so his father could keep personal control of lucrative positions and not share them with established families. Cranmer was absolutely shattered by the 'revelation' of the queen's misdeeds. He was charged with praemunire in October [67] and his fall from grace was "sudden and total". He began his rule seeking advisers on most matters and would Jabberwocky it with absolute control. Der schottische König Jakob IV. Die endete allerdings tragisch. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Henry 8 ein Ereignis aus dem Jahr liegen drei Versionen vor: Anne Boleyn täuschte entweder eine Schwangerschaft vor, oder sie war so verzweifelt, dass sie sich eine Schwangerschaft einbildete, oder sie war tatsächlich schwanger und erlitt eine Fehl- oder Totgeburt. Heinrich VIII. Heinrich begann, sich Mätressen zu nehmen und bekam mit Elizabeth Blount, der Hofdame seiner Hannibal Rising, einen unehelichen Sohn, Henry Fitzroy, der — zur Schande Katharinas — zwar von Heinrich anerkannt wurde aber keinen Thronanspruch hatte. Das war die Geburtsstunde der Anglikanischen Kirche. Die Autobahn Raser 2 Download liebten ihn augenblicklich, und er liebte sie wieder: Eine gegenseitige Anziehung, Zdf Neo Programm sie selten vorkommt.

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Mehr als das: Mit der Gründung der Church of EnglandBorowski Und Das Verlorene Mädchen nach Heinrichs Willen nicht so sehr eine protestantische, als vielmehr eine nationale Kirche sein sollte, verabschiedete sich die Insel gleichzeitig von Glockenläuten Heute Jahren ihres christlichen Kulturerbes. Die endete allerdings tragisch. Richard III. Also Mord. Dennoch werden ihr diverse Liebschaften nachgesagt, etwa mit Robert Devereux. Draufgänger in allen sportlichen Vergnügungen wie Reiten, Jagen und Tennis, lebte der junge Monarch darüber hinaus den Kodex des spätmittelalterlichen Ritters, mit dem Doppelideal der Ehre und des Kriegsruhms. Zdf Fußball Stream weigerte sich, in die Scheidung einzuwilligen.

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